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Law

Asked by Roni

Constitutional conventions

Constitutional conventions are rules of good political behaviour. They are typically rules of self-restraint, not exercising powers to the full. They usually develop from established constitutional practice, but sometimes are deliberately created; and to count as a convention, they must be generally accepted to be binding. In the UK’s constitutional arrangement, one well-known convention is that t... more

Krishitha's profile picture
Krishitha Mannan
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1.1k students helped

Law

Asked by Harry

What GCSE'S do 8 need to take to become a lawyer

Hi Harry, I would recommend in addition to English, Maths and Sciences that you take History, possibly Economics (for commercial awareness) and one of the languages. In essence you want to get good practice with essay based subjects. When you come to chose your A-levels that's when your choices are even more critical. Subjects like:English Literature, History, Politics, Religious Studies/Philoso... more

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Nelma Antonio
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598 students helped

Law

Asked by Sophie

How would you go about approaching a question asking why the mirror principle is the most important principle in registered land? And what authorities would you look into?

The Law Commission Report No 271 describes what the mirror principle is in this quote: "the register should be a complete and accurate reflection of the state of the title to land at any given time". So why is the mirror principle the most important principle in registered land? This is because the Land Register records all salient legal information relating to each physical plot/parcel of land... more

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Nafisah Mahmood
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49 students helped

Law

Asked by Anna

What gcses do you need to become a lawyer

Hi Anna, thank you for your question. I studied Law at University and the GCSE’s I did in addition to the compulsory ones were Business Studies, History, Spanish and French. I don’t think it matters so much which GCSE’s you pick as much as the grades matter so I would suggest picking GCSE’s you are passionate about and therefore will naturally do better in. If you have any A-levels you are particu... more

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Deleted Account
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612 students helped

Law

Asked by Amy

THE CASE FOR AND AGAINST THE UK ADOPTING A WRITTEN CONSTITUTION

Arguments for the UK having a codified constitution are that it would clarify the law, help to limit our over-powerful government and help to decentralise power. Arguments against include that, as the USA experience shows, a written constitution doesn’t always clarify the law, it gives too much power to judges, an unwritten constitution enables our political system to involve in response to public... more

Krishitha's profile picture
Krishitha Mannan
·

1.1k students helped

Law

Asked by Molly

Crack in the mirror

This relates to what appears to be a contradiction between the idea behind registered land and the group of overriding interests in registered land. The contradiction leads to the distortion of the mirror image which can be called the 'crack' in the 'mirror principle'.

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Dawn Mitchell
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94 students helped

Law

Asked by Prisca

Cracks in mirror principle

This relate to what appears to be a contradiction between the idea behind registered land and the group of overriding interests in registered land. The contradiction leads to the distortion of the mirror image which can be called the 'crack' in the 'mirror principal'

Krishitha's profile picture
Krishitha Mannan
·

1.1k students helped

Law

Asked by Amy

Case for and against the uk adopting a written constitution

Introduction Constitutions are the foundations for virtually every nation in the world. To put it simply, it is a system of rules that establish the structure of the state and the principles by which it operates. In other words, they simultaneously create, empower, and limit the institutions that govern society[1]. Different from many countries, the British constitution cannot be found in one sin... more

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Mehakdeep Arora
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422 students helped

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