What Mass of zinc reacts with sulfric acid is to make 2.08x10^-3Grams of H2 gas?

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Abdul Hannan Khan

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Carrying on from previous answer (apologies accidentally submitted the answer) Rearrange the equation to: Mass = RMM * No of moles Mass = 65.38 (RMM of Zinc) * 1.04*10^-3 (No of moles of Zinc) Mass = 0.0068g is the mass of Zinc.

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Abdul Hannan Khan

I would like to help children develop thier critical thinking skills.

I'm assuming this is a 1:1 reaction between Zinc and Sulfuric acid. Based on this we know that the no of moles on the on both sides are the same and the following reaction occurs: Zn + H2SO4 --> ZnSO4 + H2 We have the following: Relative Molar mass (RMM) of Zinc: 65.38 RMM of H2: 2 Mass of H2: 2.08*10^-3 g First we need to work out the no of moles of Hydrogen present: No. of moles = mass / RMM No. of moles = 2.08*10^-3 g / 2 (g/mol) No. of moles = 1.04*10^-3 mol Since no. of moles are the same on both sides we can say the zinc has 1.04*10^-3 moles as well No. of moles = mass / RMM Mass = ? No of moles = 1.04*10^-3 mol RMM of Zinc = 65.38 g/mol Rearrange to: Mass = RMM*

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