Get an answer in 5 minutes

We'll notify as soon as your question has been answered.

Plus iconAsk a question to our educators
ENGLISH
Asked by Ruby

How do you write a perfect PEAL paragraph for gcse?

The PEAL paragraph method is a technique used in writing to help structure paragraphs in a way that presents a single clear and focused argument, which links back to the essay topic or thesis statement. PEAL paragraphs introduce the main topic which you’re about to discuss, allowing your paragraph to gain a real sense of clarity and focus. Though a PEAL structure, you can also showcase your arguments and evidence to support your thoughts and opinions. P = Point: start your paragraph with a clear topic sentence that establishes what your paragraph is going to be about. Your point should support your essay argument or thesis statement. E = Evidence/Example: here you should use a piece of evidence or an example that helps to reaffirm your initial point and develop the argument. A = Analyse: next you need to analyse exactly how your evidence/example supports your point, giving further information to ensure that your reader understands its relevance. This is where you apply your critical thinking skills, giving real depth to your answer. L = Link: to finish the paragraph off, you need to link the point you’ve just made back to your essay question, topic, or thesis. Once you’ve written your PEAL paragraph, do a checklist to ensure you have covered off all four elements of the PEAL structure. Your point should be a clear introduction to the argument you are making in this paragraph; your example or evidence should be strong and relevant (ask yourself, have you chosen the best example?); your explanation should demonstrate why your evidence is important and how it conveys meaning, and your link should summarise the point you’ve just made and link back to the broader essay argument or topic. Keep your paragraphs clear, focused, and not too long. If you find your paragraphs are getting lengthy, take a look at how you could split them into multiple paragraphs, and ensure you’re creating a new paragraph for each new idea you introduce to the essay. Finally, it’s important to always proofread your paragraph. Read it once, twice, and then read it again. Check your paragraph for spelling, grammar, language, and sentence flow. A good way to do this is to read it aloud to yourself, and if it sounds clunky or unclear, consider rewriting it.

Alyssa's profile picture
Verified
Alyssa Miller
·

6.3k students helped

PEAL stands for Point, Evidence, Analysis, Link. Point - You must firstly establish the main idea you are looking to discuss. Evidence - Here you are looking to identify any words / phrases / imagery or other linguistic technique in the sentence which supports your ‘point’. Analysis - You must then explain how these words / phrases / imagery or other linguistic technique support the ‘point’. For example, the word might convey a certain emotion and therefore make the reader think a certain way about the person or place being described. Link - Conclude by linking back to the original point and explaining how the the feelings or attitudes generated reflect the idea.

Liam's profile picture
Verified
Liam Flin
·

1.6k students helped

Please provide a sample question so that I may illustrate practical application and you can use this as a template. Nonetheless, this is something you will have to work on slowly and improve over time. Constant repitition with the intention of attaining perfection.

Nazmul's profile picture
Verified
Nazmul Hussain
·

1.5k students helped

Similar English questions

Need help with English?

Getting expert help from a tutor is a great way to improve your English grades.

Badge showing the text 'New'Learn English with Video Lessons

How to Analyse (Unseen) Poetry
20m · 7 videos
Nina's profile picture
Nina Modak
·

2k students helped

How to Analyse (Unseen) Poetry
Analysis of 'Ozymandias' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
42m · 4 videos
Nina's profile picture
Nina Modak
·

2k students helped

Analysis of 'Ozymandias' by Percy Bysshe Shelley
The Basic Principles of (Prose) Literature
1hr 12m · 9 videos
Nina's profile picture
Nina Modak
·

2k students helped

The Basic Principles of (Prose) Literature
How to Write an Academic Essay: Crash Course
1hr 42m · 12 videos
Nina's profile picture
Nina Modak
·

2k students helped

How to Write an Academic Essay: Crash Course

Premium video lessons available now on Scoodle

50% discount available

Scoodle's video lessons make learning easy and fun. Try it for yourself, the first lesson is free!