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What is the best way to revise so the information gets stuck in your head and you don’t forget it?

17 answers
Answered Jul 20General
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Ali RajaniKCL Medic | Evidence based coaching 124 students helped

1. Firstly understand the topic. You may find it easier if you organise the topic into a tree of questions which explain the topic to the foundational knowledge required to grasp the concept. 2. Apply the concept in questions or revisit the material in a way where you need to pull information out of your head. You can do this via past papers or flash cards. This is known as active recall. This process forces you to produce the information as if it is a reflex, making it essential for instant responses in exams. 3. Create a routine of active recall where you test your understanding and memory of a given concept on a regular basis (Every other day at first, then fortnightly as you become confident). This ingrains the knowledge to guarantee long term retention. This step is known as spaced repetition.

Answered May 20General
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Jimm InciongSavvy tutor and undergraduate at City, University of London10 students helped

Do not barrage yourself with many information at once. Focus on one topic, practice on it, study the information as many times as required until you fully understand it before moving on to another topic. Also, it’s better to revise during the morning scientifically explained and for obvious reasons too. Revising at night could lead to lack of sleep but if you can limit yourself from revising then that would be great! Another one is find a space that would disconnect you from any distraction. Any kind of daily entertainment would be a danger to focused revising. One last thing, drink water regularly!

Answered May 20General
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Marian KutsoatiResourceful tutor in physical, applied and social sciences at Imperial College.37 students helped

Begin your revision as early as you can with a detailed plan of executing each topic at a time. Using mnemonics as well as pins on clipboards is a sure way to freshen your memory on previous studies. A tidy learning environment is another booster and also seeking opinions from experts help.

Answered May 20General
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Tommy ClohertyI love helping people meet their goals!12 students helped

I find that putting key information on Post It notes all around your home, so you are getting constant reminders, helps. Please note that you shouldn't put dozens and dozens of notes up, otherwise you will just become overwhelmed with information! Review a few key points before you go to bed at night, which helps your brain store the information; again, not too much or it won't work!

Answered Apr 20General
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Jocelyn ManuAccomplished tutor and undergraduate at Brunel University London148 students helped

The best tips and tricks for revision- Mainly is determination that you will do well. - Making a revisionsturctted list first for what to revise for - typing things on documents (revision notes) and organizing this in a structured folder with headings at the front on the dividers to remind yourself what needs to be highlighted - Listening to YouTube videos -Colour coding by highlighting -Taking notes in phone and snapshoting it - Organising your revision: Objectives, key words and Main points/ideas and people/ or whatever x -

Answered Apr 20General
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Alissa BaptistePassionate tutor and who is ready to teach!21 students helped

Learning styles vary from person to person some like to write out stuff over and over some prefer to watch videos and listen to the material over and over

Answered Mar 20General
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George RobertsEnthusiastic Maths tutor and Engineering undergraduate158 students helped

I believe the best and most simple thing to do is regularly write down on paper the sentence or concept you are trying to revise and then say what you have written out loud in order to get it stuck and memorised in your brain.

Answered Mar 20General
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Benjamin MansourEnthusiastic tutor by day and UCL medic by night!296 students helped

Hi Jess! This is really all about trying different things and seeing what works for you. Start by trying to understand how you learn best, whether you are a visual learner, learn by repetition etc. I personally learn best by making notes, then writing the notes down several times bit by bit until it sticks. Hope this helped!

Answered Mar 20General
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Sophie AkhtarVersatile tutor and undergraduate at King's College London157 students helped

I use acronyms to help retain information so for example making up words/sentences For example if you wanted to remember the colours of the rainbow Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo Violet

Answered Mar 20General
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M.G. RabbaniResourceful tutor and Graduate at Imperial College London30 students helped

Read everyday at least once then only info will get stuck in your head and it will be very hard for you to forget that.

Answered Mar 20General
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Alina HussainHard-working tutor and who is ready to teach!11 students helped

I would recommend creating flashcards for each topic you are studying for a specific subject. I would then learn one pack of flashcards per day or 3 days. I would then write out everything i have learnt on a piece of paper. I would then use a different coloured pen to add in any information i have missed. I would then do the same thing with the same flashcard pack the next day. I would repeat this until I am unable to add in any more information in a different colour. I would then do exam questions to apply knowledge

Answered Mar 20General
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Sofiya HodgkinsonVersatile tutor and undergraduate at University of Turin259 students helped

Hey there Jess! You know, the best way is the way that works for you. So you have to do a lot of trial and error... I would say that having different methods to study with work super well. Go from flash cards, to reading out loud, to trying to teach your family/friends. Making stories and links with something you know well (like a song or a movie) is a great way to feel confident long term too.

Answered Mar 20General
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Stacey RebeccaPassionate tutor and undergraduate at The University of Exeter11 students helped

I find revision cards are amazingly helpful! Look at the information you are trying to learn and try and formulate a question to ask yourself which would make you give the answer in front of you. Write the question on one side and then the answer on the back. Lay them all out question side up and try and answer them. Repeat with question side down when you think you know them or vice versa. Great for revision in pairs or groups too. All make some up and put them all over the table. See who can get the most!

Answered Mar 20General
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Livi SheppardSeasoned tutor and Graduate from University of Birmingham. 86 students helped

Firstly, ensure you fully understand the concept of what you are studying. If you don’t understand it, it’s going to be much harder to remember. Secondly, learn what kind of learner you are - some are visual, auditory, kinaesthetic etc so take a quick online test and find out as this will help you adapt revision techniques. Some helpful tips that helped me are; 1. Mnemonics - e.g OCEAN for remembering the Big 5 Personality traits. (Openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness and neuroticism) 2. Read out loud / record yourself and play it back. 3. Colour code everything. Writing in specific colours for specific topics will help! 4. Mind maps of the most important information and how concepts are connected. 5. Flash cards.

Answered Jan 20General
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Freya O’DonoghueHard-working tutor and undergraduate at University of Kent10 students helped

Hi Jess, The method I used at school (and still do use!) was first taking my time with the information, and making sure I understand what’s presented. (If you don’t fully understand it in the first place, it’s harder to revise it without being put down, so I’d ask for help on anything you’re unsure about). I then would test my knowledge of the information by explaining it to someone else, such as a friend or family member. I find that the more you talk it out like a conversation, the more it sticks. I also use this method with presentations, ideas and problem solving. Sometimes when you talk it out, it becomes clearer in your head. Hope this helps!

Answered Dec 19General
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Clare RegerHighly qualified and experienced maths tutor10 students helped

Research has shown that re-reading something is not a good method, but reviewing the information in new ways is. Try to read for understanding and condense the information into key points to remember. Then write yourself a test to do on the parts you find hardest. Give yourself some time (a day or two, or longer) to forget (this stage is important) then complete the test. Go over and 'mark' your test and write a new one with the stuff you're still struggling with. Repeat after another interval. Finally, periodically review your list of key points and if anything doesn't make sense review the original source. This method means you are reviewing the stuff you find hardest to remember multiple times, whilst also giving yourself time to forget (research has shown this is a key stage in the learning process). The 'research' referred to can be found in David Didau's book "what if everything you knew about education was wrong". Good luck 🙂

Answered Apr 19General
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Jacky KhoueiryLLM graduate - Experienced tutor in Law and Arabic10 students helped

The best way to revise is to read out loud the entire piece of information that you need to learn and highlight the important parts with a highlighter. After this, you should write down in detailed note form the important pieces of information with a pen whilst again saying them out loud. The next day you should read the entire piece of information again and not only the highlighted parts. After this, you should read over your detailed notes and be able to expand on each point from what u remember from the entire piece you first read