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PSYCHOLOGY
Asked by Phoebe

How do you memorise every case study in detail? What’s the best method to learn them?

I would advise you to get record cards and firstly write the name of the study at the top in a coloured pen (e.g. Milgram). Then, for all cases split it up like this: Aim - what was the researcher trying to find out? Method - tell me about what they did Results - what were the findings? Conclusion - what did the researcher draw from the research? Then, test yourself or get someone to test you.

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Isla Cheung
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1.1k students helped

For me, the way I achieved the best results in my uni exams was by using exaggerated images. You create a list of the terms, names, dates, theories, evidence, or anything else you want to make sure you remember. Count up how many points you’ve chosen (we’ll now call this number X). Next you choose a place you are very familiar with (maybe your house or your walk to school) and identify X places along the way. For example, if I needed to remember 10 points I might choose my bed, my bedroom door, the top of the stairs, the bottom of the stairs, the living room, the kitchen, the extension, the back door, the patio, and the garden gate. Next I find silly ways to remember the points I’ve identified. If I wanted to remember Milgram I might break that down into Mill and Gram and create a silly image of a windmill being weighed; or I might just use an image of someone being electrified in a cartoon style; or I might choose a man in a white coat with a clipboard. You can do this with basic images but if they’re silly or vivid they stick in your mind better. So I’ve now put an electrified skeleton on my bed, and I’m walking to my bedroom door. The next thing I need to remember is that this is an Obedience study (so I don’t get confused with Conformity) so I might have an oversized police officer blocking the door whilst playing Simon Says. Next I need to remember that the stooge was called Mr Wallace so at the top of the stairs I have Wallace from Wallace & Gromit picking a card from a hat. Once you’ve mastered this technique you can include more information at each point. For example, in one of my uni exams I needed to remember that a psychologist called Stevens talked about genetic determinism in schizophrenia, so I put an image of my ex-boyfriend (whose surname was Stevens) at the doorway to my lecture theatre, and he was holding the textbook I’d been using to study schizophrenia and dancing around a huge sculpture of DNA. I then had other items on a table next to him to remind me of evaluations I would need to consider. Inside the lecture theatre I had my friend wearing three tiaras to remind me of three aspects of a theory by Tienary. She was standing in front of the screen, and behind her was a huge diagram we had drawn up during some project work and which I knew well, which contained further details about the study. Some of the images I used had dates attached (it could be as simple as someone holding a calendar, or it could be huge dancing inflatable numbers, or it could be people you know of certain ages standing together). If you can master this technique, the possibilities are endless! One tip: don’t try and use the same location twice. As you can see, I still remember details I needed for my uni exams, and I took those ten years ago.

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Each individual has their own ways of learning that benefits them, whether it is through audio, visually, physically etc. Personally I remembered case studies by creating mind maps and flash cards. The mind maps would have key words that lead onto one another for me to remember key aspects/names/dates. The flash cards would have extra information relating to the key words. I used to stick them up around the house and read them as I was going around. I also found it helpful teaching my mum about the studies I was learning. If I described it all to her and answered her questions surrounding it I was more likely to remember the details. Ultimately you have to find what works best for you, but I hope these suggestions help.

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Lauren Woods
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507 students helped

I’m personally an audio-visual learner. So the most effective way for me to remember the experiments is to: 1. Draw it out. You don’t have to be an artist to do this, stick figures will do! For example, if you want to remember the Stanford prison experiment, draw out a prison with some inmates and guards, and of course the master mind Zimbardo. If you need to remember more details about the experiment, add a few bullet points/speech bubbles/labels in the margin (or anywhere really) to jog your memory. That way you’ve created a whole scene where all the details are tied to each other. It is also more likely to stick to your memory than passive reading. 2. YouTube! There are quite a few videos out there that summarize experiments, or even show you the actual experiment in action. Again this can be very memorable and engaging. Make sure to write notes to reinforce your memory as you watch the videos. 3. Explain it to someone else. Even if you haven’t got all the details memorized, try to explain the experiment to someone who might not know about it. You can try to answer their questions if they have any, or keep notes of the details that you tend to forget. This will help store the information in your long term memory because you’re producing the information rather than -I repeat- passively reading. I hope this helps, and good luck :)

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Iman Ben Ahmed
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288 students helped

I would say the best way is to record the information on your phone and then listen back to it - it works like music and you end up remembering information easier!!!

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Zhane Connolly
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479 students helped

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