Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Total answers10 questions answered
Total hoursUnder 5 hours taught
Total resourcesUnder 3 resources

Jonathan provided

ID
Phone number
Email address
Bank account
£20per
hour

Hi, I'm Jonathan

A recent change of circumstances has lead to me learning how to teach English as a foreign, or second, language. An experienced public speaker, I’m happy to add this skill set.

Jonathan is verified

Our verification process ensures that teachers meet our high standards of quality & excellence.

My education

The TEFL Academy logo

The TEFL Academy

TEFL - TBC (2018 - now)

My subjects

My availability

7am - 12pm
12pm - 4pm
4pm - 10pm
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday

My answers

Asked by Liam

English 🇬🇧
Is the following sentence missing any apostrophes? If so, where?:The CEOs job is to make decisions for the company?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

The only missing apostrophe is for CEO. The CEO’s job... It is the job belonging to the CEO.

Asked by Micheal

English 🇬🇧
Is it grammatically correct to use Neither in the start of a sentence?Example- Neither would the toddler give up the toy nor come inside?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hi Micheal. In short, yes, it is possible to start a sentence with ‘neither.’ If it’s good enough for Shakespeare, it’s good enough for us. (“Neithe...Learn more

Asked by Tim

English 🇬🇧
Can a proper noun function as a possessive adjective? Can the names of specific people act as adjectives?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hi Tim. No, if you’re using a noun then it’s a possessive noun, not a possessive adjective. Jane’s car - possessive noun. Her car - possessive adjec...Learn more

Asked by Liam

English 🇬🇧
What does it mean to "strike while iron is hot"?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Literal iron is heated and then shaped immediately after its removal from the heat source. If left too long, it ceases to become malleable. To strik...Learn more

Asked by Max

English 🇬🇧
What is the subordinate clause in the following sentence?:After the teams practiced in the rainstorm, the only intact field was the soccer field?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

“After the teams practiced in the rainstorm,” is the subordinate clause. On its own it doesn’t make sense. You need additional information, the rest...Learn more

Asked by Jeniffer

English 🇬🇧
What is the antecedent of the pronoun in the sentence? Take this letter and drop it in the mailbox at the end of the street?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hi Jeniffer. So we know the pronoun is ‘it.’ What does ‘it’ refer to? ‘This letter.’ That’s the antecedent.

Asked by James

English 🇬🇧
Is "scattered" a verb? For example,"Scattered around the sable wooden bench, the leaves skipped across the ground?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hello James. Although scatter can be a verb, in this context it’s an adjective. It defines the leaves, a noun. Skipped is a verb here.

Asked by Richard

English 🇬🇧
What is a metaphor, simile, hyperbole, irony, alliteration, and imagery?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Metaphor: description of one thing using the quality of something dissimilar. ‘A blanket of snow.’ Simile: description of one thing using the qualit...Learn more

Asked by Jeniffer

English 🇬🇧
Are there any possessive pronouns in the following sentence? If so, where?:Their friendship goes back a very long time?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hello again Jeniffer. No, there aren’t any possessive pronouns in that sentence. ‘Their’ is a possessive adjective.

Asked by Micheal

English 🇬🇧
Which of the following is an idiom?
Profile picture
Verified

Jonathan Kington

A new, enthusiastic English teacher, specialising in TEFL.

Hello again Micheal. There’s no ‘following’ in your question, but an example of an idiom is ‘over the moon.’ It is clearly not meant literally but i...Learn more